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Avocado Nail Butter, 15ml

Item #: 51001
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Avocados are not just for delicious guacamole! Give your nails and cuticles a daily health boost with this luxuriously rich LCN favorite! The Avocado Nail Butter is a rich vitamin cream full of natural avocado oil. The oil is known to have a high content of Vitamins A and E and if used regularly the LCN Avocado Nail Butter can serve as a daily health boost for your nails and cuticles.  
AVOCADO OIL is a highly therapeutic oil rich in Vitamins A, B1, B2, D, and E. Skin problems, especially eczema, are reputed to respond well to it high vitamin content. VITAMIN A is a wonderful vitamin for the skin for many reasons. Vitamin A helps to protect the skin from free radical damage, in addition to speeding the cell renewal process. Vitamin A contributes to a healthy, youthful glow. Topical vitamin A can also be very beneficial for skin care or general age prevention. Vitamin A in retinol form can be applied topically to the skin to lessen the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. Low-level retinol creams can be found in the store, but high-dose creams need to be obtained with a prescription from your doctor. Topical vitamin A treatments have also been used to treat acne.

VITAMIN E's substantiated capabilities include: Protecting the epidermis from early stages of ultraviolet light damage; Increasing the efficacy of active sunscreen ingredients; Reducing the formation of free radicals upon skin exposure to UVA rays and other sources of skin stress; Preventing the peroxidation of fats, a leading source of cell membrane damage in the body; Reducing transepidermal water loss from skin and strengthens the skin's barrier function; Protecting the skin barrier's oil (lipid) balance during the cleansing process; Reducing the severity of sunburn.  2002 and 2008 studies both reported that vitamin E had protective antioxidant effects on the skin. The 2002 study demonstrated effects in people with vitiligo, a skin disorder. It concluded that vitamin E can provide protective effects to skin but may not affect vitiligo. The 2008 study noted that vitamin E has antioxidant effects on the skin, especially
in the form of alpha tocopherol. It also noted that vitamin E can protect against "photoaging."��_��__